Acts of Solidarity in Cusco

I have noticed many examples of solidarity in Cusco. Peru is recovering from previously extremely hard times during the pandemic, and therefore there is a lot of solidarity in efforts to diminish COVID-19. Everyone wears a mask on the bus and in many public spaces. To my surprise, people even wear masks while walking by themselves through their neighborhood streets. While I am completely in support of masks, it is interesting to compare and contrast the United States, particularly Florida, with Peru when it comes to this issue. When I left Florida, I felt that hardly anyone was wearing a mask anymore, especially not when they are outside. I think it is commendable that everyone here is willing to work together like this to help their community. 

Another example of solidarity that I have noticed in Cusco is giving to those in need. While many people in the United States might give to charity in private, I don’t often see people donating to people on the street. This is very common in Cusco. One time I was riding the bus and this man got on and began very loudly preaching about something and trying to sell a book. I thought that those around me would be annoyed by this man disrupting their somewhat-peaceful morning bus ride, but when the man was done speaking, around half of the people on the bus bought his book from him. I feel like this would not have happened in the United States, as I have been in places like the Subway where people pay no mind to those trying to sell things. I can appreciate how the people of Cusco want to take care of each other, and I think these acts of solidarity say a lot about their culture. 

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